Kyle Edmund ‘sees the light again’ after nearly two years

Kyle Edmund can finally see the end of the tunnel after being completely absent from the circuit for nearly two years. The British tennis player, born in 1995, played his final singles tournament in Vienna in late October/early November 2020. Subsequently, he underwent no fewer than three knee surgeries, effectively ending his career.

The former world number 14, who is now ranked 497th by the ATP, has recently picked up the racket again and competed in mixed doubles with fellow Brit Olivia Nicholls at Wimbledon (exiting in the first round against U.S. pair Sock-Gauff).

In an interview with the official ATP website, Edmund detailed his ordeal from the time he first experienced pain in his knee to his recent return to the court, where he finally feels like “a tennis player rather than a rehabilitation professional,” despite still having to accept living with the knee problem despite surgery.

“It’s not all solved, but I wake up happy today,” said Edmund.

British tennis player Kyle Edmund, who had to take almost two years off to have three surgeries on his knee, was the focus of a video profile on the ATP’s official website.

The 27-year-old Johannesburg native discussed the harrowing experience he had during the interview, stating that he must now learn to live with the problem but also declaring that he is once again a legitimate tennis player.

Edmund started off by saying, “It hurt to play with it, but I did so for a while, maybe two years.” Because of the injury, I considered starting a training regimen to help me recover. Eventually, I realized that I didn’t want to spend the rest of my career playing like this.

Therefore, let’s take action. Long periods of time were required. There is no foolproof method for treating this, and it won’t heal on its own. It has become routine for me at this point.

I’m ok with it now. This issue will persist as long as I am alive. It’s not like things have been resolved after three surgeries. But now that I’m where I want to be, I’m enjoying the game and not dreading it like I did when I was a rehabilitation professional.