Top coach: “I would have hated for Rafael Nadal to have turned out…

From 1990 until 2008, Hamburg was still on the Masters 1000 calendar. Stefan Edberg, Marcelo Rios, Gustavo Kuerten, and Roger Federer were the most notable champions, however one notable name was omitted from that list. Rafael Nadal had always favored Rome to Hamburg, where he had lost to Roger in the 2007 championship match but had a second chance the following year.

After being eliminated early in Rome in 2008, Rafa traveled to Hamburg where he faced Rome’s champion and world No. 3 Novak Djokovic. Rafa won 7-5, 2-6, 6-2 in three hours and three minutes indoors on the Central Court in his ninth match—and seventh victory overall.

To defeat Rafa on clay for the first time, Novak had an additional motivation. With this win, he could have overtaken number two in the world, but despite his best efforts and 19 break chances, he ultimately lost. The Serb’s opponent advanced to the final match against Roger Federer despite only making four of his attempts and taking five breaks.

Both had roughly the same number of winners. Djokovic overtook Nadal in the category of forced errors after adopting a combative stance. But despite his best efforts, he committed too many unforced errors—often at vital times—to lose the match and drop to No. 1 in the world.

3. Novak grabbed a break at 1-1 in the first set, and he extended his lead in the third game with a forehand winner down the line. In the first game of the match, Nadal missed 14 of his first 18 shots. He fell behind 30-0 in the fourth game before fending off two break attempts and recording a point.

After Rafa’s forehand winner in game five, Novak squandered a game point and lost his composure. In the sixth game, the Spaniard avoided a break point to finally come up to the opponent and tie the match at 3-3.

Nadal has a fantastic chance.

Toni mentions how his nephew was a well-behaved lad as a child in Rafael Nadal‘s autobiography.

The foundation of everything, he asserted, is respect for others, for everyone, regardless of who they may be or what they may do. It is unacceptable for persons who have achieved success in life to act rudely toward others.

No, you have a stronger obligation to treat people with respect the higher up you are. Toni said, “I would have hated my nephew to have turned out any other way, to have performed tantrums on court, to have been churlish with his opponents, with the whole world watching on TV. ” When asked what he would have done if Nadal had been an unruly boy, Toni replied, “I would have done whatever I could to make him behave.

Or to be rude to the umpires or the spectators, for that matter. Being a decent person is more important than being a good player, I constantly say, and his parents agree.