Rafael Nadal is so assured, according to a prominent coach.

Rafael Nadal experienced a lot of happiness during the first half of the season. The Australian Open and Roland Garros victories by the Spanish champion confirmed his status as a living legend and put a stop to the possibility of retirement. The former world number one had to leave Wimbledon before the semifinals, ending his chances of completing the “Calendar Grand Slam.”

He was unable to play against Nick Kyrgios due to an abdominal tear, however this did not take away from his outstanding 2022. The 36-year-old from Manacor has elevated himself at 22 Slams, giving him a ranking advantage of +1 over Novak Djokovic and +2 over Roger Federer overall.

Given that it is unlikely that Nole will be able to fly to the US at the end of August, the Iberian will attempt to extend further at the US Open (not being vaccinated against the Coronavirus). Rafa will take part in the Masters 1000 tournament in Montreal the following week.

Paul Annacone, a former coach of Pete Sampras and Roger Federer, examined the development of Nadal in an interview with the Tennis Channel.

Nadal is exposed first by Annacone

The tennis player Rafael Nadal is really confident, Annacone added.

“Considering those figures, a champion on hardcourts 25 times. People’s complaints that “he is one-dimensional” and “he was just so dominant on the clay” make conversation tiresome. This guy is a multi-instrumentalist.”

In addition to competing in tournaments, Nadal had to manage his academic obligations. The 22-time Grand Slam winner has explained how he was able to perform all of these tasks at once. The former World No. 1 has detailed how he balanced tennis and his studies in his autobiography, “Rafa: My Story.”

“My mother focused her enthusiasm and motivation on the areas where I was weaker, like my schoolwork,” he remarked. Due to this, after protecting me from Barcelona, my parents decided that when I was fifteen, I should follow my father and Toni’s example and enroll in a boarding school in Palma.

He continued, “Called the Balearic Sports School, it was customized to my needs—regular school lessons with plenty of tennis built in—and it was only an hour’s drive from home. I was unhappy there, though. My parents, especially my mother, were worried that all this tennis was ruining my academic career.

I was worried that the academics would interfere with my tennis career. My prospects of competing at the Wimbledon Junior Tournament and the Roland Garros tournament were both destroyed by them.