Nick Kyrgios defeats Stefanos Tsitsipas in an exciting match in Washington in the past.

In 2019, Nick Kyrgios and Stefanos Tsitsipas had their first encounter. It became an absolute cracker thanks to the doubles partners, with Kurgios surviving a match point to win 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 in two hours and seven minutes.

The Australian won the same number of points as the top seed and prevailed in that exciting tie break to progress to his ninth ATP final. As was predicted, Kyrgios‘ customary tantrums with the crowd and chair umpire made the match into a showdown.

Tsitsipas, on the other hand, frequently experienced issues with his shoe, and once Stefanos regained his rhythm in set number two after being outplayed for the first 12 games, they remained neck and neck. They both served at 64 percent and earned the exact number of points after the first and second serve in the constellation seen only once in ten or fifteen years.

The only difference was that Kyrgios stopped six of eight break attempts.

In Washington in 2019, Nick Kyrgios defeated Stefanos Tsitsipas and preserved a match point.

Tsitsipas avoided one of three break points to set up the dramatic and thrilling tie-breaking match.

Nick played better in the first set, slipping three points behind the opening shot and winning game three with a thunderous forehand winner to secure a break. After 31 minutes, the Australian finished the set with a magnificent smash winner in game 10 to make the score 6-4.

Nick broke once more at the start of the second set, this time with momentum on his side. After winning game two, the triumph was in plain sight. Small gestures from the audience caused the Australian to lose his rhythm, lose his thunder, and act like the worst guy in the world.

His opponent, the chair umpire, and the aforementioned crowd—which quickly switched to the Greek’s side—were all in a terrible predicament. After Nick’s double fault in game four, Stefanos broke back, scored a second return game at 3-2, and won the set with a service winner at 5-3 to force a deciding.

At 2-2, Kyrgios unleashed two winners to thwart break attempts. He continued to play well and won the tie break after a tense hold at 5-5. In the tiebreaker, Nick jumped out to a quick 5-1 lead before dropping the next five points. At 5-3, he committed a double error, allowing Stefanos to earn a match point with two successful shots.

At 8-7, Kyrgios converted the second match point with a forehand winner to keep himself in contention for the championship. He found a beautiful serve to reverse it.